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Revegetation - Other

Soils

  • An Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service publication, this Extension Fact Sheet describes soil reclamation options. 

  • This document lists various laboratories in the western United States that perform soil testing. 

  • This Natural Resources Conservation Service Technical Note provides information on: characterization of saline and sodic soils;effect of salinity on plants; management of salinity problems; planting in saline-sodic soils;and species selection for salt affected areas.
  • Working with managers, Rocky Moutain Research Station researchers have evaluated the available treatments for short-term rehabilitation of both smaller, hand-built and larger, machine-built burn piles. For the smaller piles, they found that both soil nitrogen and plant cover recovered to a level similar to that of the surrounding forest within two years, indicating that these scars may not need rehabilitation unless in a sensitive area. Seeding with native mountain brome was an effective option for the larger piles, whereas mechanical treatment either alone or with seeding did not increase plant cover. The root causes behind the long-term lack of trees are not yet clear, and the next step is to conduct field and lab studies to evaluate whether soil factors, competition with grasses, and/or herbivory are possible explanations.
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    This guide dives into topics such as:
    - Overview of Soil Conservation: Threats, Land overuse, Slash and burn
    - The Importance of Soil Conservation for Sustainability
    - A List of Soil Conservation Resources
    - Soil’s Essential Roles and their Influence in the Carbon Cycle
    - Benefits of soil conservation: Optimizes Water Infiltration, Minimize Erosion
    - 9 Soil conservation practices: No-till Farming, Terrace Farming, Crop Rotation
    - Tips for addressing anxiety in students
    - How Soil Conservation Reduces Climate Change’s Impact
    - And much more!
     
     
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    What Constitutes Healthy Soil in Riparian Ecosystems? Contrasting and Relating Soil Properties Between Riparian and Upland Zones
     
    Charles Peacock1
     
    1USDA-NRCS, MLRA Soil Survey Office, Grand Junction, Colorado, USA; charles.peacock@co.usda.gov
     
    The explosion of interest in soil health (quality) in the agriculture sector in recent years has prompted questions about how these concepts apply to soils in riparian ecosystems. What makes healthy riparian soil and how does that compare to healthy soil properties in an agriculture setting? Do the same management principles apply (such as the 5 NRCS principles)? From a watershed perspective - What are the relationships between uplands and riparian lands in regard to soil properties and management? The purpose of this presentation and poster is not to provide succinct or definitive answers to these questions specifically but rather a call to encourage continued thinking and discussion to address them. The basics of agricultural soil health will be presented but the bulk of the presentation will be formatted towards a question and answer discussion versus a lecture regarding soil health in riparian systems.
     
     
     
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    https://www.custommycos.com/resources/

    Lisa Markovchick and Zsuzsi Kovacs created this resource page to help land managers apply basic mycorrhizal science in context-specific programs to boost management outcomes. 

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    What Constitutes Healthy Soil in Riparian Ecosystems? Contrasting and Relating Soil Properties Between Riparian and Upland Zones
     
    Charles Peacock1
     
    1USDA-NRCS, MLRA Soil Survey Office, Grand Junction, Colorado, USA; charles.peacock@co.usda.gov
     
     
    The explosion of interest in soil health (quality) in the agriculture sector in recent years has prompted questions about how these concepts apply to soils in riparian ecosystems. What makes healthy riparian soil and how does that compare to healthy soil properties in an agriculture setting? Do the same management principles apply (such as the 5 NRCS principles)? From a watershed perspective - What are the relationships between uplands and riparian lands in regard to soil properties and management? The purpose of this presentation and poster is not to provide succinct or definitive answers to these questions specifically but rather a call to encourage continued thinking and discussion to address them. The basics of agricultural soil health will be presented but the bulk of the presentation will be formatted towards a question and answer discussion versus a lecture regarding soil health in riparian systems.
     
     
     

Water

Reveg Equip & Tools

  • This guidebook provides a practical synthesis of the best available science for using beaver to improve ecosystem functions. If you are a restoration practitioner, land manager, landowner, restoration funder, project developer, regulator, or other interested cooperators, this guidebook is for you. The overall goal of this document is to provide an accessible, useful resource for those involved in using beaver to restore streams, floodplains, wetlands, and riparian ecosystems. Although the guidebook summarizes current information about how to use beaver in restoration and conservation, the knowledge base on this subject is rapidly expanding. This means that not all of the information provided has been peer reviewed in scientific journals; some of it is instead based on the real-life experience of restoration practitioners who are conducting ongoing experiments on using beaver to restore habitat. Thus the guidebook is a compilation of the current best available science, and we expect to update it regularly as the science progresses, readers provide information from their ongoing restoration experiments, or from restoration efforts of which the authors are currently unaware. 
     
  • Section B of Australian RevegetationTechniques outlines the different techniques available to direct seed or plant seedlings. Natural regeneration, mechanical and hand methods are covered. Section B will also assist you to choose the technique or techniques most suitable for your site and purposes.
  • Bioengineering practices provide resiliency for streambanks, enhance wildlife habitat, enhance organic matter inputs to streams, improve water quality, increase floodplain roughness, and heighten landscape aesthetics so important to countless residents, visitors, and businesses. Accordingly, the authors have created the following manuscript to:
    • Provide guidelines for a comprehensive bioengineering strategy;
    • Incorporate design elements that impart site stability and resilience;
    • Include project recommendations that minimize risk during periods of vulnerability;
    • Increase understanding of how to properly apply bioengineering and revegetation techniques;
    • Provide background resources on the combined forces of water and gravity as they pertain to bioengineered structures; and
    • Create a searchable Revegetation Matrix for the primary native restoration species useful for flood recovery and other riparian areas throughout Colorado.
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    Prepared by the RiversEdge West (formerly Tamarisk Coalition) in 2008, this document addresses options for the control, biomass reduction, and revegetation management components. All currently available technologies have been evaluated; however, not all are applicable for a given river location. Tamarisk is the focus of this document’s control component because it is the principle non-native phreatophyte in western watersheds. In general, the following discussion applies to Russian olive and other invasive trees but may differ slightly for each (e.g., herbicide used).
     
  • This document describes how to use a stinger, a tool to plant dormant unrooted cuttings of willows, cottonwoods,dogwoods, and other species.

  • 2018 Dolores River Restoration Partnership Annual Report 

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    Riparian Assessments and Best Management Practices with Agriculturalists along the
    Lower Animas River
     
    Alyssa Richmond1*, Melissa May2
     
    1San Juan Watershed Group, Aztec, New Mexico, United States of America; sjwg@sanjuanswcd.com
    2San Juan Soil and Water Conservation District, Aztec, New Mexico, USA; melissa.may@sanjuanswcd.com
     
     
    The San Juan Watershed Group (SJWG) is composed of citizens and local agencies working to improve water quality in the San Juan River and its tributaries. In cooperation with the San Juan Soil and Water Conservation District (SJSWCD) and the Animas Watershed Partnership (AWP), the SJWG has prioritized nutrient enrichment and bacteria pollution as the most problematic water quality issues in the New Mexico portion of the Animas River Watershed via the Lower Animas Watershed Based Plan (LAWBP). While spearheading watershed-base planning, coordinating water quality research, and conducting education and outreach the Watershed Group works with landowners to identify, prioritize, develop, and implement agriculture and livestock best management practices (BMPs) that will filter nutrient and bacterial pollution to the watershed.  
     
    With the goal of identifying agricultural producers along the Lower Animas interested in implementing BMPs and conducting free riparian health assessments with these stakeholders, the SJWG co-hosted an Agricultural Best Management Practices workshop with RiversEdge West (REW), SJSWCD, and New Mexico State University San Juan County Extension Office in June of 2019. Titled “Water, Weeds, and Wildlife: Tools for Managing Your Riverside Property,” the workshop covered topics from weed management to riparian pasture management and offered an avenue for several landowners to request further consultation. In the upcoming spring, free riparian health assessments will be conducted following the Natural Resource Conservation Services (NRCS) Visual Riparian Assessment Tool (VRAT) by the SJWG and REW. The SJWG will work with these landowners to develop projects based on these assessments and to plan future BMP projects that can be included in the LAWBP.
     
    With this opportunity to share the current outcomes and future endeavors of this BMP outreach campaign and VRAT utilization, the SJWG anticipates familiarizing fellow restoration specialists on the organization’s endeavors and feedback from landowners. Agricultural producers are some of the most valuable stakeholders to engage with for the implementation of BMP projects, and their insights, desires, and recommendations will be shared with the riparian restoration community.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

Revegetation - Other

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    Local Southwest Utah Partnership Engages Youth to Mitigate Flood Damage, Control Invasive Species, and Restore Native Habitat
     
    Wesley Pickett1*, Ian Torrence2, Aaron Wilson3
     
    1American Conservation Experience, Hurricane, UT, USA; wpickett@usaconservation.org
    2American Conservation Experience, Flagstaff, AZ, USA; itorrence@usaconservation.org
    3American Conservation Experience, Hurricane, UT, USA; awilson@usaconservation.org
     
     
    American Conservation Experience (ACE), a non-profit service organization, provides its young and diverse members with career-building opportunities in the field of restoration through education and hands-on experience. Facilitation of member growth comes partly through the organization's commitment to partners with like-minded federal, state, local, and non-profit land agencies and organizations that assist with member guidance and mentorship. Since the fall of 2014, ACE crews, based out of Hurricane, Utah, worked in conjunction with the Washington County Flood Control Authority (WCFCA). In August of 2012 Washington County, the City of St. George, Washington City, and Santa Clara City entered into an inter-local agency cooperative agreement establishing the Washington County Flood Control Authority.  The purpose of the Flood Control Authority (FCA) is to better share management, administration, and cost responsibilities for regional stormwater drainage and flood control concerns that cross common community boundaries. Projects that were completed under WCFCA guidance engaged youth crews in restoring riparian ecosystems around the Virgin and Santa Clara Rivers while protecting residential and commercial infrastructure in Washington County from potentially future devastating flooding events.
     
    Crews surveyed for salt cedar (Tamarix spp.), Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), giant reed (Arundo donax), flood debris piles, and damaged infrastructure (like gabion baskets and bridges). This work provided the WCFCA data on areas of infrastructural concern and highlighted priority areas for invasive species removal. ACE crews controlled salt cedar, Russian olive, and giant reed along the riparian corridors of the Virgin and Santa Clara Rivers by mechanical and chemical means. Additionally, along the Santa Clara River, ACE crews revegetated with native plant species in an area that was once clogged with vegetation and beaver dams and was previously at risk for flooding during high water events.
     
    Through monitoring, invasive plant control, and planting native species, ACE’s members played a critical role in the long term ecological restoration in Washington County’s Virgin and Santa Clara River corridors. Completing this work, in partnership with a local organization, advanced members’ restoration experience, knowledge, and skills through hands-on career-building opportunities. This poster will demonstrate how meaningful partnerships provide youth from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to engage in successful restoration projects and connect invasive plant management in a wilderness setting to an urban landscape.
     
     
     
     
  • Authors: Anna A. Shera, Hisham El Waera, Eduardo Gonzáleza,b, Robert Andersona, Annie L. Henrya, Robert Biedrona, PengPeng Yuea

    This report includes a comprehensive and detailed analysis of the vegetation response to a single watershed-scale restoration effort that includes 40 sites along the Dolores River from 2010-2014.

  • Authors:
    Kent R. Mosher, Heather L. Bateman
     
    Abstract:
    Amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) have been linked to specific microhabitat characteristics, microclimates, and water resources in riparian forests. Our objective was to relate variation in herpetofauna abundance to changes in habitat caused by a beetle used for Tamarix biocontrol (Diorhabda carinulata; Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and riparian restoration. During 2013 and 2014, we measured vegetation and monitored herpetofauna via trapping and visual encounter surveys (VES) at locations affected by biocontrol along the Virgin River in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States. Twenty-one sites were divided into four riparian stand types based on density and percent cover of dominant trees (Tamarix, Prosopis, Populus, and Salix) and presence or absence of restoration. Restoration activities consisted of mechanically removing non-native trees, transplanting native trees, and restoring hydrologic flows. Restored sites had three times more total lizard and eight times more yellow-backed spiny lizard (Sceloporus uniformis) captures than other stand types. Woodhouse’s toad (Anaxyrus woodhousii) captures were greatest in unrestored and restored Tam-Pop/Sal sites. Results from VES indicated that herpetofauna abundance was greatest in the restored Tam-Pop/Sal site compared with the adjacent unrestored Tam-Pop/Sal site. Tam sites were characterized by having high Tamarix cover, percent canopy cover, and shade. Restored Tam-Pop/Sal sites were most similar in habitat to Tam-Pop/Sal sites. Two species of herpetofauna (spiny lizard and toad) were found to prefer habitat components characteristic of restored Tam-Pop/Sal sites. Restored sites likely supported higher abundances of these species because restoration activities reduced canopy cover, increased native tree density, and restored surface water.
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    Evaluating Sod Mats as an Alternative to Plugs in Wetland Revegetation
     
    Susan Sherrod1*
     
    1Biohabitats, Denver, CO, USA; ssherrod@biohabitats.com
     
    The City of Fort Collins (CO) Natural Areas Department used custom-grown wetland sod mats largely in place of herbaceous plugs to revegetate a newly constructed wetland at Gadwall Pond (Kingfisher Point Natural Area). Wetland sod mats are constructed from two layers of coconut fiber matting as a growth substrate for herbaceous wetland plants. The hypotheses underlying the preferential use of sod mats for revegetation at Gadwall Pond was that the mat-rooted vegetation would be more resistant to herbivory than plugs, which are easily pulled out by waterfowl, and the higher cost per unit area would be offset by more efficient installation, faster establishment from higher growth rates, and no need for protective fencing. Moreover, the City had locally collected seed that could be used for the custom grow and ensured that the mats would represent local ecotypes. Seed from graminoids and forbs was delivered, processed, and grown over the course of ~9 months. Forb mats were experimental. All mats were delivered and installed in the late summer of 2018. Within a few days of installation, it was clear that wetland sod mats cannot withstand the high herbivory pressure at Gadwall Pond. Even the coconut fiber matting was torn apart in some areas. Protective fencing was quickly installed to protect the vegetation. The sod mats have cost more than installing plugs over the same area, but advantages in establishment success and near-term biomass gains are still being evaluated. 
     
     
     
  • 2018 Dolores River Restoration Partnership Annual Report 

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